Data and Investigative Journalism

Moderated by:
Marshall Kirkpatrick (Little Bird)
Panelists:
Francis Irving (ScraperWiki Ltd.), Jeff Jarvis (Buzzmachine.com), Michael Nelson (Microsoft Corporation), Simon Rogers (Guardian)
Panel
Location: Westside Ballroom

The data age is having a radical effect on investigative journalism. Reporters need to know how to find stories in data and social media. What are the opportunities in data for journalists, and what does the investigative reporter of tomorrow look like?

Photo of Marshall Kirkpatrick

Marshall Kirkpatrick

Little Bird

Seven years ago, presenter Marshall Kirkpatrick worked at a convenience store in a small town in Oregon, today he’s become one of the most successful tech industry bloggers online (formerly lead writer at both TechCrunch and ReadWriteWeb) and is now the CEO of a venture-backed company called Little Bird. Little Bird helps anyone do the kind of work that Marshall did to make his career in the social web: to find the right people, to discover key information, to act fast and raise your voice by adding value to conversations on a global stage.

Photo of Francis Irving

Francis Irving

ScraperWiki Ltd.

Francis Irving, CEO of ScraperWiki, is a computer programmer living in Liverpool, UK.

He was founding developer at mySociety, which over the last 8 years has made the world’s most innovative democracy websites. In 2004, TheyWorkForYou was the first website to scrape a Parliament and make a better interface for citizens, inspiring the Sunlight Foundation.

Other sites Francis helped make at mySociety include: FixMyStreet, the first national interface for reporting graffiti, potholes etc.; WhatDoTheyKnow, the first interface for making Freedom of Information requests in public.

In his earlier career, Francis founded developer tool TortoiseCVS, which with its successors is used by tens of millions of people. He has a first class degree in Maths from Oxford University.

Photo of Jeff Jarvis

Jeff Jarvis

Buzzmachine.com

JEFF JARVIS is the author of What Would Google Do? (Collins, January). He blogs about media and news at Buzzmachine.com and as a columnist for the Guardian. He is associate professor and director of the interactive journalism program at the City University of New York’s new Graduate School of Journalism. He is consulting editor of Daylife, a news startup. Jarvis was creator and founding editor of Entertainment Weekly; Sunday editor and associate publisher of the New York Daily News; TV critic for TV Guide and People; a columnist on the San Francisco Examiner; assistant city editor and reporter for the Chicago Tribune; reporter for Chicago Today.

Photo of Michael Nelson

Michael Nelson

Microsoft Corporation

Dr Michael Nelson works on technology futures as part of Microsoft’s Technology Policy Group. He is also currently an Adjunct Professor of Internet Studies in Georgetown University’s Communication, Culture, and Technology (CCT) Program, a unique, trans-disciplinary masters program for students and researchers interested in how information technology is shaping society and vice versa. Since January 2008, he has been conducting research and teaching courses on The Future of the Internet, innovation, technology forecasting, and e-government, as well as consulting and speaking on Internet technology and policy.

Before joining the Georgetown faculty, Michael spent almost ten years as Director of Internet Technology and Strategy at IBM, where he managed a team helping define and implement IBM’s Next Generation Internet strategy. Prior to that, Michael was Director for Technology Policy at the FCC, where he helped craft policies to spur the growth of the Internet. Before joining the FCC in January 1997, Michael was Special Assistant for Information Technology at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where he worked with Vice President Al Gore on telecommunications policy, encryption and online privacy, electronic commerce, and information policy.

Michael has a PhD from MIT and a BS from Caltech.

Photo of Simon Rogers

Simon Rogers

Guardian

Simon Rogers is editor of the Guardian’s Datablog and Datastore, an online data resource which publishes hundreds of raw datasets and encourages its users to visualise and analyse them. He is the author of Facts are sacred: the power of data available now on Kindle. Simon is also a news editor on the Guardian, working with the graphics team to visualise and interpret huge datasets. He was closely involved in the Guardian’s exercise to crowdsource 450,000 MP expenses records and the organisation’s coverage of the Afghanistan Wikileaks war logs. Previously he was the launch editor of the Guardian’s online news service and has edited the paper’s science section. He has edited two Guardian books: How Slow Can You Waterski and The Hutton Inquiry and its impact. Simon has just been awarded the Oxford University Internet Institute’s award of ‘Best Internet Journalist’ and was recently honoured at the Knight Batten awards for journalistic innovation. The Datablog and Datastore have won awards in 2011 for innovation from the UK’s Online Media Awards and the Newspaper Awards. In 2010, Simon received a special commendation from the Royal Statistical Society in its awards for journalistic excellence.

Sponsors

  • Aster Data
  • EMC Greenplum
  • GE
  • Lexis Nexis
  • MarkLogic
  • Tableau Software
  • Cloudera
  • DataStax
  • Informatica
  • DataSift
  • Splunk
  • 1010data
  • Amazon Web Services
  • Connotate
  • Media-Science
  • Microsoft SQL Server

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Susan Stewart at sstewart@oreilly.com

Press & Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

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