Skip to main content
Oct 15–17, 2014
New York, NY
Co-presented by O'Reilly Media, Inc and Cloudera

R Day

Hadley Wickham (Rice University / RStudio), Winston Chang (RStudio), Garrett Grolemund (RStudio), JJ Allaire (Rstudio, Inc.), Yihui Xie (RStudio, Inc.)
9:00am Wednesday, 10/15/2014
Data Science
Location: 1 E16/ 1 E17

From advanced visualization, collaboration, reproducibility to data manipulation, R Day at Strata covers a raft of current topics that analysts and R users need to pay attention to. The R Day tutorials come from leading luminaries and R committers, the folks keeping the R ecosystem apace of the challenges facing analysts and others who work with data.

9:00am – 10:30am
A Grammar of Data Manipulation with dplyr
Speaker: Hadley Wickham

Learn how to manipulate your data, large or small, with dplyr. Dplyr provides a concise syntax that makes it easy to express common data manipulation operations. It also works with multiple backends so that you can work with your data wherever it lives, in memory (data frames and data tables), in a RDBMS (postgresql, mysql,…) or in a columnar data store (redshift, bigquery, MonetDB)

11:00am – 12:30pm
A Reactive Grammar of Graphics with ggvis
Speaker: Winston Chang

With ggvis, you can easily create reactive graphics to help you understand your data. Ggvis is the big brother of ggplot2, starting from a declarative grammar of graphics, taking it to the web, and making it easy to build interactive and dynamic graphics.

1:30pm – 3:00pm
Analytic Web Applications with Shiny
Speaker: Garrett Grolemund

If a data analysis falls in a forest, does anyone hear it? Communication is an essential component of the data science process, and shiny allows you to move beyond static reports to easily build interactive web applications.

3:30pm – 5:00pm
Reproducible R Reports with Packrat and Rmarkdown
Speaker: JJ Allaire & Yihui Xie

Most data science is done in a team, and being able to easily share and reproduce artifacts is crucial. The new packrat package automatically captures the dependencies of your code when you run it, making sure that you can exactly reproduce results in the future. The rmarkdown package makes it easy to generate reproducible reports, intermingling text and code.

Photo of Hadley Wickham

Hadley Wickham

Rice University / RStudio

Hadley Wickham is Chief Scientist at RStudio and an Adjunct Professor at Rice University. He is an active member of the R community, has written and contributed to over 40 R packages, and won the John Chambers Award for Statistical Computing for his work developing tools for data reshaping and visualisation. His research focusses on how to make data analysis better, faster and easier, with a particular emphasis on the use of visualisation to better understand data and models.

Photo of Winston Chang

Winston Chang

RStudio

Winston is a software engineer at RStudio. He is a developer for the ggplot2 and devtools packages, and is the author of R Graphics Cookbook, published by O’Reilly Media.

Photo of Garrett Grolemund

Garrett Grolemund

RStudio

I specialize in teaching people how to use R – and especially Hadley Wickham’s R packages – to do insightful, reliable data analysis. I’ve worked with Hadley for five years. He was my dissertation advisor at Rice University, where I gained a first-hand understanding of his R libraries. While at Rice, I taught (and helped developed) the courses “Statistics 405: Introduction to Data Analysis,” and “Visualization in R with ggplot2”. Before that, I taught introductory statistics as a Teaching Fellow at Harvard University.

I’m very passionate about helping people analyze data better. I have travelled as far as New Zealand, where R was born, to learn new ways to teach data analysis. I worked alongside some of the original developers of R to hone my programming skills, and I collaborated with the New Zealand government in a nationwide project to improve how New Zealand teaches data analysis to new statisticians. Back in the states, I focused my doctorial research on developing pragmatic principles that guide data analysis. These principles create a foundation for learning R, which is a bit of a layer cake. R is a set of tools for implementing statistical methods, and statistical methods are themselves a set of tools for learning from data. Like all toolkits, R gives its best results to those who use it wisely.

Outside of teaching, I have spent time doing clinical trials research, legal research, and financial analysis. I also develop R software. I co-authored the `lubridate` R package, which provides methods to parse, manipulate, and do arithmetic with date-times, and I wrote the `ggsubplot` package, which extends `ggplot2`.

Photo of JJ Allaire

JJ Allaire

Rstudio, Inc.

JJ Allaire is a software engineer and entrepreneur who has created a wide variety of products including ColdFusion, Windows Live Writer, Lose It!, and RStudio.

Photo of Yihui Xie

Yihui Xie

RStudio, Inc.

Yihui Xie got his PhD from the Department of Statistics, Iowa State University. He is interested in interactive statistical graphics, statistical computing, and web applications. He is an active R user and the author of several R packages, such as animation, formatR, Rd2roxygen, and knitr, among which the animation package won the 2009 John M. Chambers Statistical Software Award (ASA). He is also the author of the book “Dynamic Documents with R and knitr”. In 2006 he founded the “Capital of Statistics” (http://cos.name), which has grown into a large online community on statistics in China. He initiated the first Chinese R conference in 2008 and has been organizing R conferences in China since then. During his PhD training at the Iowa State University, he won the Vince Sposito Statistical Computing Award (2011) and the Snedecor Award (2012) in the Department of Statistics.

Leave a Comment or Question

Help us make this conference the best it can be for you. Have questions you'd like this speaker to address? Suggestions for issues that deserve extra attention? Feedback that you'd like to share with the speaker and other attendees?

Join the conversation here (requires login)